Can algorithms violate fair housing laws?

When Carmen Arroyo asked her apartment’s management company in 2016 if her son, Mikhail, could move in with her after a bad accident left him unable to care for himself, her request was denied. A tenant-screening background check had dredged up a minor (and considering his current circumstances, irrelevant) shoplifting charge from Mikhail’s past. This past month, a federal district court judge in Connecticut agreed to let Arroyo’s lawsuit against the screening company, CoreLogic, go to trial in what experts believe is the first case of its kind, targeting a screening company, rather than a landlord for housing discrimination. The… This story continues at The Next Web

Can algorithms violate fair housing laws?

When Carmen Arroyo asked her apartment’s management company in 2016 if her son, Mikhail, could move in with her after a bad accident left him unable to care for himself, her request was denied. A tenant-screening background check had dredged up a minor (and considering his current circumstances, irrelevant) shoplifting charge from Mikhail’s past. This past month, a federal district court judge in Connecticut agreed to let Arroyo’s lawsuit against the screening company, CoreLogic, go to trial in what experts believe is the first case of its kind, targeting a screening company, rather than a landlord for housing discrimination. The…

This story continues at The Next Web