Engineer explains how Nobel Prize-winning CRISPR technique works

Researchers have been able to manipulate large chunks of genetic code for almost 50 years. But it is only within the past decade that they have been able to do it with exquisite precision – adding, deleting and substituting single units of the genetic code just as an editor can manipulate a single letter in a document. This newfound ability is called gene-editing, the tool is called CRISPR, and it’s being used worldwide to engineer plants and livestock and treat disease in people. For these reasons the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier, director of… This story continues at The Next Web

Engineer explains how Nobel Prize-winning CRISPR technique works

Researchers have been able to manipulate large chunks of genetic code for almost 50 years. But it is only within the past decade that they have been able to do it with exquisite precision – adding, deleting and substituting single units of the genetic code just as an editor can manipulate a single letter in a document. This newfound ability is called gene-editing, the tool is called CRISPR, and it’s being used worldwide to engineer plants and livestock and treat disease in people. For these reasons the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry has been awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier, director of…

This story continues at The Next Web