Adobe Premiere Pro can now natively decode ProRes Raw video files

Adobe has announced Premiere Pro (version 14.5) will now natively support ProRes Raw, finally opening up editing of Apple’s Raw video format to all Premiere Pro users. Earlier this year, Adobe started selectively supporting ProRes Raw, but only for Windows users running Nvidia GPUs. With this new update, both macOS and Windows users will be able to edit ProRes Raw video regardless of what system or GPU your computer has packed inside. The initial support is limited, in the sense you aren’t offered full control of ISO and White Balance settings as you are with Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, but it’s likely Adobe is working to get this functionality in place too. Adobe has also added ProRes Raw to LOG color space conversion. As more cameras get ProRes Raw recording, most notably with the help of Atomos who’s already brought ProRes Raw support to more than 20 cameras via its Ninja V monitor/recorder, it’s nice to see Premiere Pro finally getting the ability to decode and work with the files. Other improvements in the October 2020 release (version 14.5) of Premiere Pro include support for HDR workflows in Rec2100 PQ color space, improved hardware decoding when using AMD and Nvidia GPUS and faster audio pre-roll.

Adobe Premiere Pro can now natively decode ProRes Raw video files

Adobe has announced Premiere Pro (version 14.5) will now natively support ProRes Raw, finally opening up editing of Apple’s Raw video format to all Premiere Pro users.

Earlier this year, Adobe started selectively supporting ProRes Raw, but only for Windows users running Nvidia GPUs. With this new update, both macOS and Windows users will be able to edit ProRes Raw video regardless of what system or GPU your computer has packed inside.

The initial support is limited, in the sense you aren’t offered full control of ISO and White Balance settings as you are with Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, but it’s likely Adobe is working to get this functionality in place too. Adobe has also added ProRes Raw to LOG color space conversion.

As more cameras get ProRes Raw recording, most notably with the help of Atomos who’s already brought ProRes Raw support to more than 20 cameras via its Ninja V monitor/recorder, it’s nice to see Premiere Pro finally getting the ability to decode and work with the files.

Other improvements in the October 2020 release (version 14.5) of Premiere Pro include support for HDR workflows in Rec2100 PQ color space, improved hardware decoding when using AMD and Nvidia GPUS and faster audio pre-roll.