Why cities must narrow car lanes to make room for pedestrians

Close your eyes and imagine a typical city street. What do you see? For most of us it’s a variation of a familiar scene: two lanes of automobile traffic most likely flanked by a row of densely parked cars on either side. Confined to the periphery, narrow sidewalks accommodate the vast majority of human activity performed by pedestrians, joggers, tourists, commuters, parents, pet owners, municipal workers, and street vendors. These are the city streets much of the world has come to know and accept over the past 100 years as urban living has progressively become defined by smog, combustion engines… This story continues at The Next Web

Why cities must narrow car lanes to make room for pedestrians

Close your eyes and imagine a typical city street. What do you see? For most of us it’s a variation of a familiar scene: two lanes of automobile traffic most likely flanked by a row of densely parked cars on either side. Confined to the periphery, narrow sidewalks accommodate the vast majority of human activity performed by pedestrians, joggers, tourists, commuters, parents, pet owners, municipal workers, and street vendors. These are the city streets much of the world has come to know and accept over the past 100 years as urban living has progressively become defined by smog, combustion engines…

This story continues at The Next Web