Is your favorite podcast tracking you?

In these muddled times, at least one thing is clear: Nearly everyone’s tracking you, always. But there is one area that has been largely off-limits to digital data collectors for 20 years: podcast listening. Traditionally, the podcast ecosystem has been tracking-resistant, in part because podcasters release their shows through RSS, free technology dating back to 1999. Podcast players, also known as podcatchers, like Apple Podcasts and Castro then aggregate those episodes in easy-to-use apps. Listener behavior is strewn across a plethora of apps, many of which don’t share data with anyone, including the podcast creators. That’s all changing. Advertisers are… This story continues at The Next Web

Is your favorite podcast tracking you?

In these muddled times, at least one thing is clear: Nearly everyone’s tracking you, always. But there is one area that has been largely off-limits to digital data collectors for 20 years: podcast listening. Traditionally, the podcast ecosystem has been tracking-resistant, in part because podcasters release their shows through RSS, free technology dating back to 1999. Podcast players, also known as podcatchers, like Apple Podcasts and Castro then aggregate those episodes in easy-to-use apps. Listener behavior is strewn across a plethora of apps, many of which don’t share data with anyone, including the podcast creators. That’s all changing. Advertisers are…

This story continues at The Next Web